Exhibitions

News

  • CHART 2022 | Booth 15

    Grey Crawford | Eeva Karhu | Milja Laurila | Dominik Lejman | Santeri Tuori | Niina Vatanen | Jakub Julian Ziólkowski

    26 – 28 August 2022
    25 August: opening (invitation only)

    Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Elina Brotherus at Fotohaus Arles

    Les Règles du je
    Group exhibition

    4 July – 25 September 2022
    Fondation Manuel Rivera-Ortiz, Arles, France
  • Elina Brotherus at Fotografie Forum Frankfurt

    In Reference to a Sunny Place
    Solo exhibition

    4 June – 18 September 2022
    Fotografie Forum Frankfurt, Germany
Tiina Itkonen | Ice Has a Memory: Greenland's Vanishing Song Lines

Tiina Itkonen | Ice Has a Memory: Greenland's Vanishing Song Lines

Exhibition: 2 July – 3 September 2022
Venue: Persons Projects, Lindenstr. 35, 10969 Berlin

"Now the ice is gone. When I was a child, there was always ice for hunting.”
– Quote from Inuit Hunter

Persons Projects is proud to present Tiina Itkonen’s solo exhibition, Ice Has a Memory: Greenland’s Vanishing Song Lines, which centers around her "Piniartoq1 project on Greenland’s Inuit community, which is indigenous to the region. It captures the effects of climate change on the broader Inuit community, its hunters, traditions, and the entire village’s way of life. The dire situations shown in her photographs reveal the various complexities involved, if there is to be any hope of reversing the negative effects of global warming. Her images remind all of us, wherever we live, that real change relies not only on working closely with these local communities, but respecting their cultural values and way of life as a mirror of our own.
By the Morning, the Butterfly Was Gone

By the Morning, the Butterfly Was Gone

Ilkka Halso | Sanna Kannisto | Sandra Kantanen | Mikko Rikala

Exhibition: 2 July – 3 September 2022
Venue: Persons Projects, Lindenstr. 34, 10969 Berlin

Persons Projects is proud to present four artists from The Helsinki School who challenge pressing questions concerning the fragility of our ecosystem. In a world that is facing rapid changes in industry and capitalism, how can one reconnect with nature? What does it mean to slow down, to focus on the unseen, and appreciate nature’s temporality? These artists are among those few who remain in dialogue with nature, making a radical decision to treat our ecosystem with respect and to strengthen the human connection to it. They see that nature is unpredictable, asking if anything is predetermined. Rather than trying to control and suppress our environment – much like the large corporations fueling climate change – Halso, Kannisto, Kantanen, and Rikala work with the unreliability of the landscape, embracing it to further cement our relationship with it.

Artists